THE KLINKHAMER

THE KLINKHAMER

I  started fishing this specific pattern back in 2007 and met with immediate success. Although I’ve always punted the abilities of the fly , its been slow to catch on – a blessing in disguise. Unlike the mayfly hatches where you sometimes have to go through a lot of fly changes in order to find the correct stage of emergence or surface footprint  , this pattern distilled the smaller Hydropsychidae caddis hatch into a single fly affair. The pattern even has the ability to turn shallow feeding fish into free risers  and my biggest fish on dry , a 9lb’r  , was taken while prospecting likely lies at the onset of a hatch.

IMG_0695

Hammer Time

Part of  the pattern success is that the fish focus a lot more on the subsurface layer ( or the final inch , as Harrop would put it) during caddis emergence ,  because caddis eclode hell of a fast. This pattern deviates from the original Klinkhamer  , because the scruffy dubbing prevents the abdomen from penetrating well below the surface film , creating a footprint somewhere between a Klinkhamer and a Parachute. There’s no pretty little extras or triggers to the pattern , which after all looks like a mess  suspended below a parachute . I guess it falls in line with Charlie Craven’s apt description of a caddis pupae , which he calls the ugliest bugs in the fly fishing world – a cross between something that smashed into your windscreen and a ball of snot.

RECIPE :

HOOK : #14 light wire scud . Gamakatsu C12

for smaller #16 I just tie on 2/3 of the hook shank

TREAD : tan or yellow . Danville 70

POST : fluoro red/ pink Antron Yarn

found these colors the best for viz a dusk

HACKLE : 4-5 turns Brown Saddle hackle

SHUCK : dubbing fibres

ABDOMEN : light yellow UV Ice Dub & light yellow SLF or bleached Seals Fur

RIB: tying tread

THORAX : spiky Brown Dubbing

Good luck and good night

Good luck and good night