Improved Bloody Squirmy

The Bloody Squirmy fly that I tied for carp successfully fooled fish (http://feathersandfluoro.com/?p=9208); however, the fly didn’t last very long due to the thread cutting into the squirmy wormy rubber material, which eventually peeled off the hook shank like scabs from an old wound. Not even UV resin could hold the damaged rubber in place (which eventually cracked through the resin), so I used a slight modification in the tying sequence, which makes the tying procedure a little more tricky and time consuming if compared to the original fly (as similarly tied by Philip Meyer from Winelands Flyfishing (Philip tied a similar fly for trout, which worked very well for him in the 2010 South African Flyfishing Nationals), the Yanks and Europeans, and Nick Van Rensburg from FlyBru – see http://feathersandfluoro.com/?p=10507), but the fly is much more durable.

Fly Tying sequence of the improved Bloody Squirmy (orange version):

Place a #10 scud hook with a black or hot orange tungsten bead on it in the vice and wrap hot orange thread to the bend of the hook.
Place a #10 scud hook with a black or hot orange tungsten bead on it in the vice and wrap hot orange thread to the bend of the hook.
Tie in a strand of clear vinyl cord at the bend of the hook (roughly in alignment with the hook eye) and wrap the thread to the bead (to form an evenly shaped body, ensure that the vinyl cord is wrapped with thread all the way to the bead before cutting off the excess).
Tie in a strand of clear vinyl cord (or red for the red version of this fly) at the bend of the hook (roughly in alignment with the hook eye) and wrap the thread to the bead (to form an evenly shaped body, ensure that the vinyl cord is wrapped with thread all the way to the bead before cutting off the excess).
Tie in the orange rubber 'squirmy wormy' just behind the bead with a few wraps of thread.
Tie in the orange rubber ‘squirmy wormy’ just behind the bead with a few wraps of thread.
Stretch the rubber squirmy wormy along the hook shank and trap it with the vinyl cord where it exits the layer of thread; continue wrapping the vinyl to the bead to form a ribbed body over the stretched squirmy wormy
Stretch the rubber squirmy wormy along the hook shank and trap it with the vinyl cord where it exits the layer of thread; continue wrapping the vinyl to the bead to form a ribbed body over the stretched squirmy wormy.
Tie in three strands of peacock herl, twist them into a noodle and cover the exposed rubber area with Hard As Nails varnish; wrap the peacock noodle over the varnish and tie off behind the bead. The 'tail' of the worm should now also be cut to approx. 1.5 inches long.
Tie in three strands of peacock herl, twist them into a noodle and cover the exposed rubber area with Hard As Nails varnish; wrap the peacock noodle over the varnish and tie off behind the bead. The ‘tail’ of the worm should now also be cut to approx. 1.5 inches long.
Tie this fly in a variety of colours (and also play with bead colour).
Tie this fly in a variety of colours (and also play with bead colour).

Note that I have had amazing carp and stillwater trout fishing on the red version, i.e., the original Bloody Squirmy imitating bloodworm (red buzzer midge larvae). I have also had very good success catching carp on an orange variation with either hot orange or black beads – depending on the mood of the fish and time of day (for skittish and/or big carp I use a hot orange bead for low-light conditions and black bead for the bright midday hours).

A large Berg River carp caught on a Bloody Squirmy with a black tungsten bead - photo by Tudor Caradoc-Davies
A large Berg River carp caught on a Bloody Squirmy with a black tungsten bead – photo by Tudor Caradoc-Davies
A lovely rainbow trout caught in Katse Dam on the modified Bloody Squirmy.
A lovely rainbow trout caught in Katse Dam on the modified Bloody Squirmy.

2 thoughts on “Improved Bloody Squirmy”

  1. Pingback: Chub on fly
  2. Edward Truter says:

    BTW, Leonard, you do not want to use Hard as Nails or any nail varnish or similar, acetone-solvent based coating or adhesive on anythng to do with Squirmy Wormy material. The acetone destroys the Squirmy stuff. I am avoiding using any glueing/finishing chemical on my Squirmy flies because I’ve not found one that’s not doing damage yet. I just tie it nice and strong with Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon thread. Remember what happened to your Squirmy crabs legs in Yemen? That was the Hard as Nails chowing it.

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