Extraterrestrial Adventures

A prettier souped-up version of the original.

I’ve always liked using big bushy dry flies. Easy to see, easy to fish, and fun to tie. The patterns I use resemble nothing in particular, and are more of a combination of other fly patterns than an imitation of a particular terrestrial. My flies probably look more like some “extraterrestrial” bug that’s just landed here from another planet, than a bug that’s just fallen on to the water from the river bank. I like a little bling in my dry flies. Some colour and exaggerated triggers are important to me, though I’ve never asked the fish if they prefer my flies to something much simpler. I may be a minimalist when it comes to my fishing, but certainly not my tying.

I heard it said that you should never share a fly or introduce into before in its tried and tested. A figure of a hundred fish was mentioned. To hell with that idea! I have caught one tiny little trout this whole season, so that might take a little time. I tie flies far more than I fish and far more than I need to. I tie a fly or two on most days, between babysitting, farming and trying to keep my wife happy.

Here follow a few of my latest dry flies that I’ve tied. I’ve modified old patterns of mine to make them more fishable and I’ve come up with a few new flies too (well new to me). I have had a lot of fun tying with CDC since I first used it just over a year ago. I can’t say that I have experienced it’s fish catching “magic” first hand, but it really does give a fly some life and buggieness.

Here follow a few of my extra terrestrial bugs. Some have just crawled off my vice this weekend and others I have tied over the last year or so. I will include a short SBS for the spider and beetle and a link to previous articles for an SBS of the other patterns.

The Lotheni Spider

Here are a few variations of a pattern that I have recently tied but not yet fished. While fishing the Lotheni River last weekend, I noticed several big grey spiders climbing over the rocks in the river bed. A tasty morsel for a trout, no doubt. I looked at my spider pattern that I was fishing, and it looked very different to the real thing that was so abundant along the river banks. Here is the spider pattern I tied after my observations on the river. I have tied it in a few colour variations which are probably not necessary, but it’s fun anyway.

This is a pretty good imitation of the naturals that I saw crawling around on the waters edge.
This is a pretty good imitation of the naturals that I saw crawling around on the waters edge.
A prettier souped-up version of the original.
A prettier souped-up version of the original.
A more slender version of the Lotheni Spider.
A more slender version of the Lotheni Spider.
This version is tied using only CDC, except of course the thread and the post.
This version is tied using only CDC, except of course the thread and the post.
While tying a spider, I got sidetracked and turned one into a beetle instead.
While tying a spider, I got sidetracked and turned one into a beetle instead.

Lotheni Spider and Beetle SBS:

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Tie in a bunch of CDC feathers and a hotspot.

 

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Dub a body with the material of your choice

 

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Pull the CDC feathers forward over the body and tie off so you can leave space for the head of the beetle or the post of the spider.

 

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Tie in two antenna and then split thread dub the CDC around the head making a CDC hackle.

 

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To tie a spider, you tie in a post which you wrap the CDC round to form a wide parachute halo hackle.

 

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Cut the hackle flush under the head and finish off the beetle.

 

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Snip the post short and tie the fly off.

A few other terrestrials from my fly box

Bungezi Beetle
Bungezi Beetle

 

The Doggy Bag Beetle is tied with my left over deer hair clippings.
The Doggy Bag Beetle is tied with my left over deer hair clippings.
The Para Daddy
The Para Daddy
My latest version of the Para Daddy which now has a CDC hackle, pheasant tail legs, and no tail.
My latest version of the Para Daddy which now has a CDC hackle, pheasant tail legs, and no tail.
The Big Daddy
The Big Daddy

 

My hopper which also has a deer hair body with a hotspot, like several other of my dry flies.
My hopper which also has a deer hair body with a hotspot, like several other of my dry flies.

Below are two links to the SBS for my hopper and Para Daddy, and another for the Bungezi Beetle

https://astreambeyond.wordpress.com/2015/12/13/my-secret-paradise-and-two-new-flies/

https://astreambeyond.wordpress.com/2016/01/24/tying-the-bungezi-beetle/

 

6 thoughts on “Extraterrestrial Adventures”

  1. Jeff says:

    Lovely. I’d imagine these would go down well on Sterkies, too.

    1. Rex Fey says:

      Thanks Jeff. I reckon those hoppers and especially the Beetles will work well for yellows, but I can’t say I’ve ever tried any of them on yellows.

  2. Leonard Flemming says:

    Rex, your flies look amazing boet – I’ll try them on our WC browns, hopefully this coming season;)

    1. Rex Fey says:

      Thanks Leonard. I reckon I would save those cdc flies for the tricky fish of streams like the witte, I don’t like having to spend too much time drying my flies between casts.

  3. Jazz Kuschke says:

    “I tie a fly or two on most days, between babysitting, farming and trying to keep my wife happy.” – Hahaha, yes Rex! x2… except when it comes to farming I’m more in the agriculture of trying to cultivate words

    1. Rex Fey says:

      Jazz what “fertilizer” do you use to fertilize your words😉

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